5 facts about Kiwifruit:

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  1. Kiwifruit is native to China, the seeds were introduced to New Zealand in 1904. They were called ‘Chinese Gooseberries’ until the 1960’s
  2. They are considered FODMAP friendly 
  3. The skin is edible
  4. High in Vitamin C - kiwifruit contain more vitamin C than an orange
  5. Contain Actinidin which can help with digestion. ‘Actinidin is a protease found in kiwifruit, which breaks down proteins and facilitates gastric digestion. This natural enzyme has the ability to break-down a wide range of food proteins more completely and faster than our natural digestive enzymes can do on their own’ http://www.zespri.com/nutritious/digestive-health.  Thats why you can get a funny feeling on your tongue if you eat too many because of all those enzymes. So if you’ve having problems getting those bowels moving, try eating a few kiwi fruit on an empty stomach. 

Sources: http://www.5aday.co.nz/facts-and-tips/fruit-vegetable-info/kiwifruit-green/ http://www.zespri.com/nutritious/digestive-health Monash University Low FODMAP app

Banana Bread / Cake with Chocolate Chunks

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A cross between my banana bread and cake recipes with chocolate added - I'm totally addicted.

What you need:

3 ripe bananas

3 eggs (lightly whisked)

1/4 cup oil

1/3 cup rice malt syrup

1 tsp vanilla extract

1 ½ cups almond flour

¼ cup ground flaxseed or LSA

1/4 cup brown rice flour

1 tsp cinnamon 

1 tsp baking soda

Pinch of salt

1/3 cup dark chocolate, roughly chopped

What to do:

Preheat the oven to 160°C

In a large mixing bowl combine dry ingredients (except chocolate) and set aside

In another mixing bowl mash bananas, add remaining wet ingredients and mix well

Pour wet ingredients into dry ingredients bowl and combine thoroughly

Add chocolate and gently stir through

Pour mixture into a greased tin (I used a square baking tin - 21cm * 20cm)

Place into the oven and bake for 40-45 minutes or until cooked through (a skewer inserted into the middle should come out clean when its cooked)

Let it sit and cool before cutting

 

Rosemary Polenta Chips

Rosemary Polenta Chips

What you need:

3 cups chicken or vegetable stock (if following low FODMAP diet, make sure onion and garlic free
2 tbsp garlic infused olive oil
1 tbsp finely chopped rosemary
2 tbsp nutritional yeast
1 tsp salt and a few grinds of pepper
1 ½ cups polenta

What to do:

Line or oil a tin 

Place all ingredients except polenta into a pot and bring to boil

Pour polenta into pot in a steady stream, whisking as you add it until it starts to thicken

Using a wooden spoon , continue cooking and stirring until mixture starts to leave the sides (approx 5 mins)

Remove from heat and spread out in tin so it is approximately 1 cm thick

Cool in Fridge

When cool, remove from tin and cut into chip or desired shapes

Either fry each side in a hot, lightly oiled frypan until golden or lightly brush each shape with oil and place on a tray into a 180 C oven and bake until golden 

Small changes to reduce my carbon footprint 👣

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Everyday I’m trying to make small changes to help reduce my carbon footprint 👣  I’m constantly learning and it’s a work in progress but I thought I’d share some of the small changes I’ve been making: #sustainability ♻️💚

  1. Taking my @keepcup reusable coffee cup everywhere I go ☕️☕️
  2. Using a reusable water bottle 
  3. Taking reusable shopping bags when doing my weekly shop
  4. Choosing fruit/veggies not wrapped plastic and not putting them in plastic bags using reusable bags instead @paperbagpantry_elana 
  5. Shifting towards more enviromentally friendly products @ecostorenz
  6. Saying No to single use plastic straws and opting for a reusable options @caliwoods_eco

Sweet Potato & Lentil Curry

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This is a one pot wonder - cut ingredients, place in a pot and put in the oven.

Some FODMAP followers make be surprised when they see lentils in a recipe, but canned lentils are actually FODMAP friendly. *1/2 cup of canned green lentils is FODMAP friendly guidance from Monash University low FODMAP app

*1/2 cup sweet potato is FODMAP friendly guidance from Monash University low FODMAP app

Its important to remember that I try an incorporate high FODMAP foods into my diet at amounts which are considered FODMAP friendly / amounts which I know I can tolerate so I can get a variety of nutrients and not limiting my diet too much.

What you need:

2 cups sweet potato

2 cans of lentils

1 cup kalmata pitted olives 

2 cans of tomatoes

1 can of coconut milk

1 ½ tbsp cumin

1 ½ tbsp ginger 

1 tbsp turmeric

1 chilli, finely chopped

2 large handfuls of coriander, finely chopped + extra for topping

Salt and pepper

Brown rice to serve

What to do:

Preheat oven to 180C

Cut sweet potato into small chucks and put aside.  Cut olives in halves

On a medium to high heat on the stove top, place a large oven proof pot and combine the coconut milk, cumin, ginger, turmeric, chilli until it begins to bubble. Add potato, lentils, olives, coriander and season with salt and pepper, combine well

Place the lid on the pot and put in oven to cook for 40-50 minutes or until sweet potato is soft

Serve with brown rice and lots of coriander 

My top FODMAP friendly sweeteners

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When it comes to sweeteners, a lot of them can be off-limits because they’re high in fructose, including honey, agave syrup and high fructose corn syrup (which are commonly added to highly processed products).

Even though sugar (raw, white and brown) is considered FODMAP friendly, I personally like to limit my refined sugar intake and use less refined sweeteners, as too much sugar for me can contribute to more inflammation in my body.

My favourite low FODMAP friendly sweeteners:

1) Rice malt syrup - Is made from 100% brown rice, has no added cane sugar, additives or preservatives and is fructose free (happy tummy!). Rice malt is the sweetener I use the most as it’s affordable (was a lot cheaper when I lived in Australia) and readily available at my local supermarket. The texture and colour reminds me of honey.

2) Pure maple syrup – Comes from the sap of maple trees. It must be 100% pure maple syrup, not the flavoured kind. Now I know it is a little more expensive than the fake stuff but not only does it taste 1000 times better it hasn't got all the added nasties. Nothing beats pancakes with maple syrup, an absolute classic! Find my recipe for these buckwheat pancakes

It is at the end of the day all still sugar, so I still try not go overboard... But maple syrup is always essential on pancakes!

Pancakes